freelancermaine

gavinosbornedrors:

howtodrawcomics:

When it comes to creating characters, sometimes it’s easy to let them slip into the same old stock standard set of body types. Basically clones with a few props, hairdos and make up to spice things up a bit. After a while, having the same actor play dress up for every character gets kinda boring…

It’s tough to break the habit too, especially when you’re taught a single set way to draw. Not to say having a solid construction method is ever a bad thing, as long as it doesn’t confine your creativity.

Check out these nifty tips and pointers by jeinu to give each of your comic book characters their own a unique flavour of memorable originality.

(To download these at full res simply hit the options menu and click download, otherwise head on over to jeinu’s DeviantArt Tutorial Gallery at http://jeinu.deviantart.com/gallery/25335623/Tutorials )

This is important, and something I super need to improve on. All these tips and stuff for drawing are crazy useful and very, very appreciated. 

commandercaswell

ricelily:

All these pages are 8.5x11, 300 dpi. Feel free to print it out in full size if you like physical copies

Comics and Comic Artists

Jake Wyatt- deviantart tumblr

"Welcome To Summers"

"Soliloquy"

Suggested Reading/Books:

Scott McCloud’s “Making Comics” (entirely done in comic format)

Exercises/Practices/Tutorials:

Lettering

Speech Bubbles Mistakes

Paint Bucket Resource

Storyboarding and Camera angles

What is DPI?

Transferring Traditional to Digital (Photoshop Tutorial)

vin-vio

Anonymous asked:

hello! can i ask for a tutorail in hands/arms and legs/feet?

zemael answered:

Hey! Sorry for the late reply, I haven’t really had time to do the tutorial for you! But, I did one today. It’s kinda messy and not 100% anatomically perfect (I do several flaws myself) but I think I made some good points!

  • Arms:

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Arms cannot be done without shoulders, so that’s why I will include them here. To know how one body part works, you need to understand the other parts too. I suggest drawing a stick figure, as shown above. Do it with shoulders and everything - don’t care about anatomy. Really, don’t - go mad! You can figure out how to deal with the anatomy AFTER you have figured how to draw the body freely.

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I imagine most body parts to be shaped as tear drops, as shown above; especially the arms and legs. Draw them above the stick figure - don’t be afraid to overlap the teardrops. In fact, I suggest it! The best way to understand anatomy is to think of it as shapes and doll-parts.

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After you’ve figured that out, do several, VERY tiny, small doodles like these. Go crazy - don’t bother with anatomy just yet. Do them also very quickly and so small you can’t think of the details. Just keep doing this until you sorta understand how arms work. 

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Here is a doodle of a “real” arm, and as you can see, how it’s shaped it resembles the teardrops above. A general rule is to constantly draw the body in curves - male AND female. NEVER draw a single line straight.

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I mentioned before I thought it was important to include shoulders/other body parts to understand another. This is why. The body basically has a “flow” when you move. The red lines clearly shows the flow. This is also how you can create a dynamic pose: think of the flow. The muscles are formed that way to be able to function. Which reminds me, buy some good anatomy books. And I’m talking about more or less MEDICAL anatomy books - you think you won’t need it - but trust me, it’s more useful than you can imagine. I do NOT suggest buying “stylistic” anatomy books, like Christopher Hart (ugh NO), for example, as these can mislead you. Medical anatomy books CANNOT because they MUST be right.

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And for the last part, here’s some “do’s” and “don’ts”. It’s important to remember the muscles between the neck and shoulders. Many, especially when drawing females, forget this. It’s true the most visible it is - the more muscular you will look. But even the most petite people have these. Your neck literally would not function if you didn’t have these supporters. Then, the arms below is just to show why it’s important to draw the body with curves. Many have probably heard “straight lines for males” which is a complete lie. They will look stiff and unnatural. Curves can both empathize muscles AND fat. Heck, even your bones aren’t straight.

  • Legs:

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Legs certainly are the hardest. There’s a good reason for this; because they’re one of our most strongest muscles, and they are more or less dominating when it comes to poses (together with the spine). However, just like with the arms, draw a stick figure. I won’t suggest drawing them completely straight, as you can see here, as it will add weight. Do teardrops shapes. As for the hips - think of them as panties or briefs. This is not a MUST; but it will help; I think!

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And just like the arms, do small doodles. Don’t be serious, play around until you get the idea.

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As you can see, these legs easily can be turned into teardrops even when they’re detailed like this.

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Now, what makes legs/hips interesting is that the way fat gathers there. Although not a must, seeing as we’re all different, females tend to get more fat there than men. Usually, however, it’s not at the SIDE of the hops, but at the thighs, calves and the “love handles”. (Excuse my english, aaah…) Women also tend to have bigger hips, but again, it’s not a must. It’s not uncommon to have small hips, either; or big hips for men, etc.

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Of course, the legs too follow the “flow”!

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Something worth noting is the “Standing point” The standing point is basically a straight line, and the further away you are from the line; the more unbalanced you are. To create a dynamic pose you should avoid that line as much as possible. However, if you want to look balanced/realistic, have the one leg stand there for support. The leg to the left is balanced, as you can see one of the legs is taking all the weight; with other words, it’s the support leg-making it balanced. The legs to the right, however, are likely to fall over if she keeps standing like that!

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Now for some more do’s and don’ts. I already mentioned the barbie legs, invisible heels and micro-mini crotch in my previous tutorial, but these two are different. I see this mistake a lot; when you sit down, your thighs will become wider because you’re pressing all the fat to the sides. Now, this also depends on how you’re positioning your legs. How much it widens depends on how much fat you have in the first place; but it will always be there.

And then there’s this awkward “thigh gap”. Before I get any haters telling me how I “thin shame”, please, take a seat and read this. Good? Good. How much space you actually have between your thighs depends fully on how you’re standing, bending, angle, body type and everything else. However, the one to the right? Not likely.

  • Hands:

image

Okay, I’m getting really lazy now; so I’ll be quick. Draw a rectangle. Sorta like this; it doesn’t have to be exactly like this - since hands can be shaped VERY differently. Just compare to your friends.

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Draw a little triangle attached to it.

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Now, the fingers! How long they should be and etc doesn’t really matter either. But if you’re unsure, draw them as tear drops, too.

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Now, draw the fingers! Starting to look like a hand, sort of.

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Then draw the details and fix things you didn’t like. I really don’t like the way this is drawn but I’m just tired right now.

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Just like the legs/arms, practice by doing that simple figure really quickly.

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Guess what? Hands also follow “the flow”!

  • Feet:

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Okay, I’m getting really lazy. Plus, feet are SUPER HARD- I’m just going to say this: think of them as triangles. Overlap them; think of it as 3D!

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Practice practice practice! And medical anatomy books. And photo references. And real-life references!

Hope this helped! \o/ As I said, I’m nowhere near perfect but, ahh, I tried.

jeansdildo

dangerous-ladies:

going-home-to-gallifrey:

dangerous-ladies:

Look: these boots are very, very simple. Actually sewing them together is no problem once you’ve got it drafted. 

It is, essentially, a sock. A sock with a fancy cuff, with a sole glued to the bottom. It is also zipper-free. You are going to make a sock that fits over a shoe, and you are going to use a knife to peel off the edges of the sole, tuck the fabric under, and then glue the soles back in place so you have a nice, clean edge.

You will need:

  • Spandex fabric in whatever color you need.
  • Extra spandex fabric with the same amount of stretch for drafting your pattern.
  • Pattern paper.
  • A pair of ballet flats (or whatever shoe type you need.) Make sure you get the right “shape”; Supergirl’s boots, for example, have a pointed toe, and look out for sole color; we usually just go with black because anything else will get dirty/paint will chip. You also want to find one with an easily removed sole; as a general rule, the cheaper the shoe, the easier time you’ll have with it. We usually spend about $5 tops on our flats, haha. If you’re trying to do heels, be very, very cautious; if you damage the structural integrity of the shoe, you might be in some trouble when you need to walk on them. You also want to make sure they are as basic as possible; remove any bows and whatever possible.
  • An exacto knife.
  • Hot glue
  • Usual sewing implements; pins, scissors, rulers, whatever. 

You can draft it yourself easily: take your scrap fabric and wrap it around your leg as I’ve pictured above in the pink, and pin it along the back. You want to make it snug, but not so snug that you can’t get your foot out of it either. POINT YOUR TOE WHILE YOU DO THIS. Additionally, wear the shoe while you pin it around your foot; it’ll need to fit over the shoe in the end anyway. Don’t worry about the bottom of your foot; it’s easier if you make the curve under your heel snug, and the front of your toes, but you’re not going to be closing off the bottom.

When you have it pinned neatly and evenly, trim the edges down. Leave enough excess for seam allowance along the back, and enough for tucking on the bottom. (Tucking into the sole, that is.) Take it off your foot and you should have some weird shape (like a mirrored version of the pattern I have pictured above.)

Now: if you trace that onto pattern paper and smooth out any raggedness you may have made in cutting, you have your basic pattern. Then all you have to do is alter the top of the pattern: a /\ point for Wonder Woman, a V for Supergirl, etc. Because we’re making Supergirl, here, you’ll want it to be in two pieces, as shown in the pattern above. Wherever you cut to change the design, be sure that you add seam allowance (as you can see on our bottom pattern.) Also make sure that the top edge of your sock is snug enough to your calf that you won’t have to constantly bend to fix them.

I’ve taken pictures of my and Christine’s patterns. Obviously, if you don’t want a seam down the front, you need to cut the fabric on a fold. You will need four of the top cuff and two of the “sock”; the top cuff is two-layered so it’s got a clean top!

Sew all the cuffs: in the last picture, that’s what they should look like. First, sew them all at the back seam. Then layer them together to sew the top seam, so that when you fold them right-side out, you have finished cuffs as pictured. Topstitch whatever you want.

Sew the sock’s back seam.

Sew the cuff to the sock. Be very careful about the corners, so that they are sharp. Again, topstitch whatever works.

Use the exacto-knife to separate the shoe from the sole. Don’t take the whole sole off — you don’t want to pop it out of alignment, or compromise TOO much of the shoe’s integrity. You just need enough opened that you can tuck the bottom edge of your sock into the space between.

Once your whole sock is finished, it’s time for the crazy part: put it on, with your shoe. Then, with the help of a friend or with the acknowledgement that your spine will hurt trying to do it to yourself, start putting the bottom edge of the sock under the edge of the sole, and gluing in place. We have found hot glue works best because it hardens/sets fast: anything else and you may be stuck sitting there wearing your shoes for HOURS trying not to ruin your work.

Now you have boots.

Go kick some supervillain ass, girl.

maybe this could work for thigh-high boots at well? just use a bit of fashion tape to keep them up?

The problem with thigh-highs is that most people’s thighs continue to taper wider after the point where the thigh-highs stop, whereas the calf is typically wider than the spot just under the knee. The upper calf sort of acts as a natural narrowing point where the sock can cling to in order to avoid falling down… whereas the thigh can be a bit more difficult to fit :)

Fashion tape certainly works, but only if your fabric has enough vertical stretch (along your leg length-wise) to accommodate for the bend/flex of your knee. Building a thick elastic into the top of the boot tends to work better, but on some body types that can create a “muffin top” look on the thigh, so ymmv. 

Alternately, my favourite thing to do is to just build the thigh highs into leggings with flesh-coloured mesh so that the whole thing is a set of tights. That’s how I’ll be doing Supergirl’s N52 boots, eventually.

- Jenn

no-other-words
fashioninfographics:

Visual Shoe Dictionary
More Visual Glossaries (for Her): Backpacks / Bags / Bra Types / Hats / Belt knots / Coats / Collars / Darts / Dress Shapes / Dress Silhouettes / Eyeglass frames / Eyeliner Strokes / Hangers / Harem Pants / Heels / Lingerie / Nail shapes / Necklaces / Necklines /  Puffy Sleeves / Shoes / Shorts / Silhouettes / Skirts / Tartans / Tops / Underwear / Vintage Hats / Waistlines / Wool
Via

fashioninfographics:

Visual Shoe Dictionary

More Visual Glossaries (for Her): Backpacks / Bags / Bra Types / HatsBelt knots / CoatsCollarsDarts / Dress Shapes / Dress Silhouettes / Eyeglass frames / Eyeliner Strokes / Hangers / Harem PantsHeels / Lingerie / Nail shapes / NecklacesNecklinesPuffy SleevesShoes / ShortsSilhouettes / SkirtsTartans / Tops / Underwear / Vintage Hats / Waistlines / Wool

Via

lewn-atic
fashioninfographics:

A Visual Dictionary of Tops
More Visual Glossaries (for Her): Backpacks / Bags / Bra Types / Hats / Belt knots / Coats / Collars / Darts / Dress Shapes / Dress Silhouettes / Eyeglass frames / Eyeliner Strokes / Hangers / Harem Pants / Heels / Nail shapes / Necklaces / Necklines /  Puffy Sleeves / Shoes / Shorts / Silhouettes / Skirts / Tartans / Vintage Hats / Waistlines / Wool
Via

fashioninfographics:

A Visual Dictionary of Tops

More Visual Glossaries (for Her): Backpacks / Bags / Bra Types / HatsBelt knots / CoatsCollarsDarts / Dress Shapes / Dress Silhouettes / Eyeglass frames / Eyeliner Strokes / Hangers / Harem PantsHeelsNail shapes / NecklacesNecklinesPuffy SleevesShoes / ShortsSilhouettes / SkirtsTartans / Vintage Hats / Waistlines / Wool

Via

zoldydick

yagazieemezi:

'Blue Note' - Model: Armando Cabral  - Photographer: Billy Kidd - Fashion Editor/Stylist: Benjamin Sturgill - Details Magazine May 2014

"From cobalt, to teal, Yves Klein to azure, a familiar color looks effortlessly modern, especially when it comes to your summer suit."

  • Z Zegna suit - Dries Van Noten shirt
  • Ralph Lauren Black Label suit & sweater - Paul Stuart scarf
  • Canali suit - Burberry Prorsum shirt - Hermés shoes
  • DSquared2 suit - Missoni tank top - Bottega Veneta shoes
  • Tommy Hilfiger suit - John Varvatos shirt
  • Prada suit & shirt
  • Gucci suit - Etro shirt
  • Salvatore Ferragamo suit - John Varvatos cardigan